Renewable Energy: Tidal Wave Hubs, Wind, Biomass, Jobs, Policy  Opportunity

Renewable Energy: Tidal Wave Hubs, Wind, Biomass, Jobs, Policy Opportunity

Loading
Loading Social Plug-ins...
Language: English
Save to myLibrary Download PDF
Go to Page # Page of 33

Description: Nova Scotia energy research and development forum 2010, The talk, the danish case, wind, cofiring, minnesota community wind case, economic impacts of wind, applications in rural communities, the new hampshire mill case, economic impact of a new hampshire, natural resources defense council, the economics of renewable energy, renewable and appropriate energy laboratory(RAEL) study, renewable electricity plan.

 
Author: David Wheeler, Ph.D (Fellow) | Visits: 1823 | Page Views: 1830
Domain:  Green Tech Category: Environmental Subcategory: Government policy 
Upload Date:
Short URL: http://www.wesrch.com/energy/pdfTR1AU1PJULLTK
Loading
Loading...



px *        px *

* Default width and height in pixels. Change it to your required dimensions.

 
Contents:
Nova Scotia Energy Research & 
Development Forum 2010
Dr David Wheeler
Pro Vice‐Chancellor & Dean of Business
University of Plymouth, England

The Talk





When things work
When things do not work
What opportunity looks like
Are we up for the challenge?

When things work

The Danish Case
20% total energy supply from 
renewables:
3% ‐ biogas
8% ‐ heat pump
14% ‐ straw
20% ‐ wind
23% ‐ bio‐degradable waste
32% ‐ wood
(Danish Energy Agency, 2009)

The Danish Case: Wind

20% electricity supply from wind
>150,000  families were either members  of 
cooperatives or owned turbines directly
> 5,500 turbines installed,
The cooperative ownership model now spread to 
Germany and the Netherlands.
5.7 billion Euros export in 2008, 28,400 employed

Danish Case: Cofiring 
• Avedoere Power Plant block 2 is a 570 MW 
power plant  near Copenhagen that uses 
wood, straw and natural gas.
• Studstrup is a 700 MW CHP plant near Aarhus 
that co‐fires straw and coal.
• Maabjerg power plant is 30 MW plant in 
North Western Jutland which uses wood, 
straw, waste and natural gas.

Minnesota Community Wind Case
Juhl Wind has developed 
14 wind farms with a 
total of 117 MW installed 
capacity in Minnesota
> 20 projects under 
development with a 
potential total capacity 
of 425 MW
5 MW to 20 MW scale 
preferred, representing a 
capital investment of $10 
‐ $40 million

Minnesota Community Wind Case
"We want economic 
development and to 
keep jobs in our 
communities.  The 
revenue stream stays in 
the community. When 
we build these projects 
we are small enough 
that we can utilize local 
talent" 
Dan Juhl, 2010

Economic Impacts of Wind 
Applications in Rural Communities         
(National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 2006)

Wind installations create a large direct impact 
on the economies of rural communities, 
especially those with few supporting industries. 
For example, in communities in which farming is 
the only large industry, the installation of wind 
farms creates another industry that becomes a 
large percentage of the local tax base and 
contributes to local businesses. 

Minnesota Community Wind Case
• Comparing community wind to a fictional 
"absentee" project, NREL found that construction 
employment effects can be 1.1 to 1.3 times higher 
and operations‐period impacts 1.1 to 2.8 times 
higher for community wind.
• NREL researchers concluded that community wind 
projects have "greater economic development 
impacts than absentee‐owned projects" 
• NREL recommended that policies prioritizing higher 
levels of local ownership are "likely to result in 
increased economic development impacts."

The New Hampshire Mill Case       

The New Hampshire Mill Case   
• 100 year history in the City of Berlin (‘The City 
that Trees Built’) pop 10,000
• Fraser Papers closed 2006
• Laidlaw Energy LLC bought part of facility 
including recovery boiler to convert to a 66 MW 
biomass to energy plant
• 20 year power purchase agreement with the 
Public Service Company of New Hampshire
• 40 direct jobs; 500 indirect jobs

Economic Impact of a New Hampshire 
Renewable Portfolio Standard 
(University of New Hampshire,2007)

the 20 percent renewable energy target will 
create thousands of jobs with wages much 
higher than the current state average, 
generate over $1 million in state revenue, 
and provide a "newfound opportunity for NH 
residents to start businesses."

Wood is a particularly promising source of 
biomass if it is derived from sustainably 
managed operations or reclaimed waste 
products. Sustainable forest management 
requires, for example, the protection of old 
growth forests and critical wildlife habitats, 
rather than wholesale conversion to 
intensively managed, monocultural tree 
plantations. 

When things work......
• Elimination of quick fix options 
• Maximization of community ownership  and local 
economic development opportunities
• Establishment of long term fiscal incentives 
• Public policy stability and alignment
• Integration of academia, R&D, standards 
development, etc
• Planning consents, environmental, legal and social 
license issues dealt with consensually 
• Business engages strategically

When things do not work

The Economics of Renewable Energy
(Select Committee on Economic Affairs 4th Report of Session 2007–08)

Increasing the share of renewable  electricity 
generation from 5‐6% to 34% would raise the 
annual cost of generation and transmission by 
£7.5 billion. 
The cost of generation and transmission would 
rise from 4.7 pence per kWh of total output to 
6.7 pence per kWh (£80 per household per 
annum)
This implies that the additional cost is about 
£130 per tonne of carbon dioxide emissions 
avoided.

The Economics of Renewable Energy
(Select Committee on Economic Affairs 4th Report of Session 2007–08)

….contracted wind projects in Scotland, only 
17% have planning consents. Across Great 
Britain, only 23% have consents…
…..against a background of developing 
technologies and uncertain costs, the 
Government will need to give a firm lead, with 
clear priorities and realistic objectives, while 
maintaining the stable framework needed by 
investors in the context of the long lead times 
needed by many energy projects.

The Economics of Renewable Energy
(Select Committee on Economic Affairs 4th Report of Session 2007–08)

What is holding back wave energy?
Risk/Cost of demonstration. 
No large companies pushing the technology.
Size of devices (typically 100m per MW)
Requires hundreds of machines, each the size of 
a tube train; potential impact on shipping
• Energy transmission from large numbers of 
floating structures.
• Limited supply chain






The Economics of Renewable Energy
(Select Committee on Economic Affairs 4th Report of Session 2007–08)

What is holding back in‐stream tidal energy?
• Risk/cost of demonstration.
• High initial costs and extended operating lifetimes.

What is holding back tidal barrage energy?





Cost
Environmental issues
Investment risk
Grid connections.

When things do not work......
• Quick fix and centralised options remain  on the 
table (nuclear and CCS)
• Community ownership invisible; case for local 
economic development/regeneration not made
• Long term fiscal incentives absent or confusing
• Public policy unstable and/or misaligned
• Low levels of integration between academia, R&D, 
standards development etc
• Planning consents, environmental,  legal and social 
license issues dealt with bureaucratically or through 
conflict
• Business does not engage strategically

What does
opportunity look
like?

Renewable and Appropriate Energy  
Laboratory (RAEL) Study
University of California, Berkeley (2004)

Examined 13 studies on the economic benefits 
of renewable energy.
Approximately 240,000 jobs could be created 
and maintained if the US passed a 20 percent 
by 2020 RPS 
"We found that you get three to five times the 
amount of jobs in the renewables area than 
you do in fossil fuels."
Dan Kammen

Renewable
Electricity
Plan

Renewable 
A path to
Electricity  good jobs, stable prices, and
a cleaner environment.
Plan 
April
A path to good jobs, stable prices, and a 
cleaner environment. 

Government of Nova Scotia           
(April 2010)

In the process of transitioning to a system that is 
cleaner, more diverse, more domestic, and more 
secure, this plan will support as much as $1.5 
billion in green investment—creating good jobs 
and growing the economy. Specifically, the plan 
will create jobs in construction, supply, 
manufacturing and maintenance, generating an 
estimated 5,000 to 7,500 person‐years inside the 
province, with opportunities in both urban and 
rural areas. 

Government of Nova Scotia           
(April 2010)

By focusing on renewable energy sources like 
wind and tidal, which are naturally abundant in 
Nova Scotia, this plan enhances opportunities to 
create good jobs and grow the economy in every 
region of Nova Scotia. Traditional rural 
industries like forestry and agriculture can build 
wealth and add jobs by developing the 
sustainable renewable energy sources they 
manage already. And capitalizing on Nova 
Scotia’s unparalleled tidal potential can build an 
industry here at home with opportunities 
around the world. 

Who wins?
Municipalities
First Nations
Co‐operatives
Non‐profit groups
Electricity consumers
Nova Scotia Power Inc
The Nova Scotia Economy (rural and urban) 
The Nova Scotia Environment (rural and urban)

Are we up for the
challenge?

At mid‐tide, the flow in Minas Channel 
north of Blomidon equals the 
combined flow of all the rivers and 
streams on Earth…..

Chris Campbell ‐ OREG on Tidal Energy





190 sites and ~42,200MW in Canada
29 sites and ~3,000MW in the Maritimes
10 jobs/MW manufacturing and installed
0.03‐0.1 jobs/MW operation and 
maintenance

Wave Hub and some device developers

Orecon www.orecon.co.uk

Powerbuoy
www.oceanpowertechnologies.com

Buldra www.fredolsen-renewables.com

James Cameron (Climate Change Capital)
….offshore wind farms could provide 
employment for more than 70,000 
people in the UK by 2020….

Offshore Energy Research and 
Commercialisation Opportunity
• Can we learn from the onshore wind and 
biomass stories?
• Can we learn from jurisdictional stories: US, 
Europe etc?
• Will our policy‐makers create political and fiscal 
stability?
• Will our academic and R&D partners be up to 
the job globally (esp Canada‐UK)?
• Will the larger companies engage strategically?

Subscribe
x