Job Interview Elements

Job Interview Elements

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Description: Problem Solvers: Solutions focused, sticks to the issues and strives for the best solutions, Open to reason, Shows concern for others, treats them with respect, makes them feel valued, Identifies issues, explores alternatives and agrees on solutions, Owns responsibility for their behavior removing their part of the problem, Good self-control including over their speech, Good listeners who listen intently to opinions of others, Peacemakers who are good at turning conflict into problem solving, Stays objective regardless of what others do or say, Straightforward, honest and trusted to present information accurately. Confronts, offers ideas, or takes a stand, but attacks problems not people, Open to feedback, teachable, and eager to learn and improve, Style increases likelihood of communications, cooperation, good relations.

 
Author: Dominion Enterprises & Hatch (Senior) | Visits: 658 | Page Views: 864
Domain:  Business Category: Management 
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Contents:
Win the Interview
16 Action Takeaways
Circuit Job Fair
Presented by Dominion Enterprises & Hatch
Slover Library | April 21, 2016

Win the Interview
Contents:
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Interview Elements
Recruiter’s First Call Questions
Problem Solvers *
Business Competencies *
Performance Criteria *
Initiative in Performance *
“Tie Breakers” *
Work History Questions
KSA/Accomplishment Questions
Motivation Questions
Education/Training Questions
Strengths/Business Competencies Questions
Questions You Ask
End Interview Qs for You
Post-Interview Actions
Questions for References

* Preparation / Self-Appraisal *

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

2

Interview Elements
Expect a structured interview. Prepare:


Work History
Employment Stability | Relevance of Experience



KSA/Accomplishments
Technical Competence | Sustained High Performance



Motivation
Industry | Company/Dept. | Position/Profession



Education and Training
Formal Education | Training/Certifications | “LLL”



Personal Strengths/Business Competencies
”Fit" for Position, Department, “Corporate Culture”

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

3

Recruiter’s First Call
Get ready to answer a call from a corporate recruiter or headhunter.
Write these Qs and your answers and get ready to field the calls.











Why in job market?
Possible job titles desired?
What roles and responsibilities important?
Special abilities as described by colleagues?
Your claim to fame?
Closer? Innovator? Team Builder? Problem Solver? Leader?
Your top accomplishments?
Company and industry preferences?
Geographic preferences? Will you relocate?
Travel ability? What is your threshold of pain?
Compensation requirements?
Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

4

Problem Solvers
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] Solutions focused, sticks to the issues and strives for the best solutions
] Open to reason
] Shows concern for others, treats them with respect, makes them feel valued
] Identifies issues, explores alternatives and agrees on solutions
] Owns responsibility for their behavior removing their part of the problem
] Good self-control including over their speech
] Good listeners who listen intently to opinions of others
] Peacemakers who are good at turning conflict into problem solving
] Stays objective regardless of what others do or say
] Straightforward, honest and trusted to present information accurately.
] Confronts, offers ideas, or takes a stand, but attacks problems not people
] Open to feedback, teachable, and eager to learn and improve
] Style increases likelihood of communications, cooperation, good relations
How many of the above traits are among your strengths?
Ask about the Harley-Davidson success story!
Credit: Dr. D.D. Warrick
Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

5

Business Competencies 40
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Approachability
Business Acumen
Comfort Around Higher Management
Command Skills
Compassion
Composure
Creativity
Customer Focus
Decision Quality
Delegation
Developing Direct Reports
Directing Others
Ethics and Values
Integrity and Trust
Interpersonal Savvy
Learning on the Fly
Listening
Managing and Measuring Work
Motivating Others
Negotiating

(Lominger 67)

21. Organizational Agility
22. Paradox, Dealing with
23. Patience
24. Peer Relationships
25. Perseverance
26. Personal Learning
27. Perspective
28. Planning
29. Presentation Skills
30. Priority Setting
31. Problem Solving
32. Process Management
33. Results, Drive for
34. Standing Alone
35. Systems, Managing through
36. Teams, Building Effective
37. Time Management
38. Understanding Others
39. Vision and Purpose, Managing
40. Written Communications

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

6

Performance Criteria
What separates an outstanding performer from an average performer?
Learn these “Total Contribution” elements and speak to them with ease.
Most of us understand good performance involves three criteria:

1.
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Quality and consistency of quality in your work
Timeliness of your work results
Quantity or amount of work you produce

“Total Performance Contribution” includes:

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Difficulty or complexity of your work assignment
Experience you have compared to the job level you are assigned
Supervision you need to achieve your goals
Resources used independently to enhance your performance results
Coworker impact, positive or negative, from your help and cooperation
Suggestions that impact the workplace within and outside the department
Work Innovations that improve the performance results within your job

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

7

Initiative in Performance
See the value in your day-to-day working relationship with your manager.
Employee "Mode of Operations"

Value to Organization *

1. Take Action and Advise Routinely
2. Take Action and Advise Immediately
3. Recommend and Take Action

Highest Value
Higher Value
High Value




Low Value
No Value

Ask what to do...
Watch, wait… do nothing…

Adapted from:
"Management time: Who's got the monkey?” Join the cult following. Read it! **
William Oncken, Jr. and Donald L. Wass
Harvard Business Review, November - December 1974 | #2 all-time reprint
** http://hbr.org/products/99609/99609p4.pdf
** http://www.businessweek.com/managing/content/nov2007/ca20071120_606468.htm

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

8

Tie-Breakers
Tie-Breakers

Select from apparently equal candidates for hire or promotion

Assess long-range potential or career development needs

Differentiate in judgment areas of performance appraisals
Eleven Tie-Breaker Values:
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Value Sense
Cue Sense
Analytical Sense
Systems Sense
Territorial Sense
Expertise Sense
Priority Sense
Future Sense
Power Sense
Career Sense
Ethical Sense

Rule Sense
Literal Sense
Generality Sense
Tunnel Vision Sense
Parochial Sense
Know-It-All Sense
Administrivia Sense
Historical Sense
Authority Sense
Unfounded Faith Sense
Unethical Sense
CREDIT IBM MIDDLE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

9

Tie-Breakers
Value Sense Knows the intent of the rules

Rule Sense Knows the what of the rules but

and policy and why they were established
Cue Sense Knows intent of direction given
by non-direct cues or symbols
Analytical Sense Objectively handles
information, avoids simplistic labels,
identifies middle ground along a spectrum of
facts, ideas, issues
Systems Sense Knows complexity of
reality, takes a global look to understand
variables operating and how they interrelate
Territorial Sense  Knows assignment
boundary but discretely tests to maximize
contribution; takes broad view of role

not why they were established

Literal Sense Knows the direction only when
spelled out in direct language

Generality Sense Thinks in simplistic terms
like “either / or” or “good / bad” and is
indiscriminate in labeling people, things and
situations

Tunnel Vision Sense Views situations from
too limited a perspective (his/her specialty) and
fails to seek other perspectives

Parochial Sense Interprets roles from narrow
viewpoint, rarely reaches out to test boundaries
and is boundary versus contribution focused

CREDIT IBM MIDDLE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

10

Tie-Breakers
Expertise Sense Seeks advice of more

Know-It-All Sense Does not recognize need

knowledgeable and fully utilizes expertise
available within the organization
Priority Sense Knows data environments
have “vital few” mixed with “trivial many”
and so quick sorts to put first things first
Future Sense  Plans, anticipates
changes, dedicates time to looking ahead
and noting trends; argues with success
Power Sense Knows people of influence
regardless of title, those who others seeks for
advice
Career Sense Knows honestly, hard work
and good performance go with visibility and
sponsorship when seeking promotion
Ethical Sense Knows ethical behavior and
integrity builds trust

for special expertise and hesitates to seek advice
from others who may contribute

Administrivia Sense Operates on data
sequentially and does not quick scan to develop
an effective work strategy and time budget

Historical Sense Preoccupied with history
and falls back on past experience exclusively
giving little thought to change

Authority Sense Knows who is responsible
for what but not where influence lies

Unfounded Faith Sense Believes honesty,
hard work and good performance are all that
count and is blind to organizational realities
Unethical Sense Does not recognize that
unfair and unethical behavior destroys trust

CREDIT IBM MIDDLE MANAGEMENT SCHOOL

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

11

Interview Questions #1
Work History/Experience
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How did you acquire your last three positions?
Which of your past companies would you be most eager
to rejoin? Why?
What would references from previous employers reveal?
What two work accomplishments have given you the most
satisfaction?
Do you have an employment agreement, a non-compete or
non-solicitation agreement?
.

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

12

Interview Questions #2
KSA / Accomplishments
1.

If you are an IT service delivery manager, you may
expect questions about:







2.

Customer satisfaction
Cost management
Decision making and problem solving
Productivity and people management
Leadership
Interpersonal/organizational effectiveness

These questions should be open-ended like:



3.

“Tell me about a time when ...” or
“Describe a situation when ...”

What single accomplishment would you consider the
most significant over the past five years?
Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

13

Interview Questions #3
Motivation for job, dept. mission, company, industry
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Why are you in the job market today?
What attracts you to our company?
How were you referred to us?
Why do you feel this job is a good fit for you?
Can you do the work?
Why do you think you will really enjoy this job?
What motivates you to put forth your greatest effort?

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

14

Interview Questions #4
Education and Training | “LLL”
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Life-Long-Learning

How do you stay up to date technically?
How did your formal education prepare you for career
success?
What’s your most significant academic achievement?
Why would your coworkers call you an active learner?
What professional development or industry
certifications are you pursuing?
What development goals have you set for yourself?

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

15

Interview Questions #5
Strengths / Business Competencies
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5.
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What would your past bosses say are some of your special
strengths or personal qualities?
How do you stay cool under pressure in very complex and
difficult situations?
Tell me about a time you overcame resistance inside the
organization to get a project done.
Discuss how your team-building skills have been recognized
in past performance reviews or career discussions?
What would your coworkers say is their biggest challenge
working with you?
Tell me why your new colleagues will like working with
you.
Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

16

Questions You Ask
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Why isn't this job being filled from within the company?
Can you draw me an organization chart so I can see where I fit in?
How many people have held this position over the past five years?
Was the last person to hold this position promoted?
What reputation does the department have within the company?
How has this position been filled in the past?
What are some accomplishments produced by past incumbents?
How many people are interviewing for this position?
What do you like most about (company name)?
May I talk with the person who last held this position?
How do employees like working for the company?
Is turnover an issue?
What qualifications are most important for this position?
Given your priorities what performance results are of highest priority?
What is the performance levels of the direct reports to this role?
How would you describe the organization's culture?
What is the biggest problem facing the department right now?
How soon will you decide if you want to make me an offer?
Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

17

End of Interview Q’s
At interview’s end seek to know where you stand.
Ask one or two of the following:
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2.
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4.

5.
6.
7.

What’s our next step?
How do I rank with other candidates for this job?
What can I do to become your number one candidate?
This job sounds perfect for me. Are chances good that I
might receive an offer?
Did my answers give you confidence in my abilities to
perform the job?
Do you have any additional questions about my knowledge
and skills?
Do you see me fitting in well with your team?

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

18

Post-Interview Action
Post-Interview Review
1.
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4.

Summarize the interview in writing within an hour
Did you cover your strengths and accomplishments?
What went well? What did not go well?
How motivated are you by the position, department goals, and company?

"Thank you" Letter
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Up-beat and concise, a summary of your value.
Focus on a point made by the interviewer: "I enjoyed hearing your views on..."
Confirm any action items or "next steps" discussed.
Include any strength that you were unable to present during the interview and
send along work samples as appropriate.
Does position and company appear to be a good fit for you? Ask for offer!

Follow-up Call back at a specific time


Demonstrate professionalism, dependability and a sincere interest in the job.

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

19

References
Most corporations have policies that restrict references due to legal liability.
Limited information like name, job title, and employment dates might be confirmed.
But you can still call former bosses, coworkers, direct reports, business associates…
Questions your references may be asked include:
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7.

How long have they known you?
What was or is their relationship to you?
What do they know of your major accomplishments?
Do they know why you left past positions?
What are your strengths and your development needs?
Did you get along well with others?
Are they able to forecast your future job potential/higher level role?

It’s okay to “coach” your references. In fact you should do so!

Courtesy Dominion Enterprises and Hatch

20

Q&A

© 2011 G&A Inc. for Dominion Enterprises
and Hatch

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