This model primarily targets the achievement drive competency. Originally Developed by Richard Shamoon and his colleagues. It has been used in many different settings with many different types of individuals, Including corporate executives, small business entrepreneurs, minority businessmen and women, business school students, police officers, and social workers. It also has been used in other countries.

Although the training has been offered in different ways, from week-long residential retreats to semester-long college courses, it typically involves 70 hours of work spread over 5 or more days. On the first day of the program, the participants are informed of the training objectives. They are told that the program is intended to increase the strength of their achievement motivation and that the faculty has confidence that the program will be effective. Next the faculty spend some time describing what achievement motivation is, the characteristics of people with strong achievement motivation, and the relation of achievement motivation to success in managerial work. These presentations include detailed discussion of research studies on achievement motivation. After listening to these presentations, the participants meet in small groups and try to identify incidents at work that demonstrate the effects of achievement motivation on business-related decision-making and performance. Each small group selects a case example to be presented to the whole group. These initial activities are designed to accomplish several objectives. First, the faculty tries to create a belief in the participants that it is both possible and desirable to develop increased achievement motivation. Second, through presentation of research.

Why use these guidelines?

Unfortunately projects sometimes fail to deliver, for a variety of avoidable reasons, e.g.:

· Failure to take into account the needs and influences of stakeholders;

· Failure to communicate and keep the stakeholders informed of developments;

· Lack of attention to the impact of project work on the normal business of the

· Organization; · producing expensive ‘Gold plated’ solutions when simple workable products would suffice; · failure to identify and deal with the many risks that can affect achievement of project objectives;

· Insufficient attention to planning, monitoring and control of the work of the project.

This guidance will help you manage these sorts of avoidable problems. However, it should not be regarded as set of standards to be followed slavishly in all circumstances. On the contrary, there are many decisions you must take about the degree of management rigour you feel is necessary to maximize the chances for success and minimize the likelihood of project failure. This guide will help you make those decisions.

This model primarily targets the achievement drive competency. Originally Developed by Richard Shamoon and his colleagues. It has been used in many different settings with many different types of individuals, Including corporate executives, small business entrepreneurs, minority businessmen and women, business school students, police officers, and social workers. It also has been used in other countries.

Although the training has been offered in different ways, from week-long residential retreats to semester-long college courses, it typically involves 70 hours of work spread over 5 or more days. On the first day of the program, the participants are informed of the training objectives. They are told that the program is intended to increase the strength of their achievement motivation and that the faculty has confidence that the program will be effective. Next the faculty spend some time describing what achievement motivation is, the characteristics of people with strong achievement motivation, and the relation of achievement motivation to success in managerial work. These presentations include detailed discussion of research studies on achievement motivation. After listening to these presentations, the participants meet in small groups and try to identify incidents at work that demonstrate the effects of achievement motivation on business-related decision-making and performance. Each small group selects a case example to be presented to the whole group. These initial activities are designed to accomplish several objectives. First, the faculty tries to create a belief in the participants that it is both possible and desirable to develop increased achievement motivation. Second, through presentation of research.

Why use these guidelines?

Unfortunately projects sometimes fail to deliver, for a variety of avoidable reasons, e.g.:

· Failure to take into account the needs and influences of stakeholders;

· Failure to communicate and keep the stakeholders informed of developments;

· Lack of attention to the impact of project work on the normal business of the

· Organization; · producing expensive ‘Gold plated’ solutions when simple workable products would suffice; · failure to identify and deal with the many risks that can affect achievement of project objectives;

· Insufficient attention to planning, monitoring and control of the work of the project.

This guidance will help you manage these sorts of avoidable problems. However, it should not be regarded as set of standards to be followed slavishly in all circumstances. On the contrary, there are many decisions you must take about the degree of management rigour you feel is necessary to maximize the chances for success and minimize the likelihood of project failure. This guide will help you make those decisions.