Wireless Environmental Monitoring: Is it right for you?

Wireless Environmental Monitoring: Is it right for you?

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Description: Hardware: Hygrometers:- Traditional monitoring device. Difficult to examine long-term trends or statistically analyze data. Precludes use of data in computational tools.

Hardware: Dataloggers:- Electronic devices that measure T & RH for graphing and analysis on computer.Most popular and practical. Terminology:- Wireless – “having no wires” but in the technology world describes any network where there is no physical connection between the sender and receiver.

 
Author: Rachael Perkins Arenstein  | Visits: 249 | Page Views: 507
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Contents:
Wireless  Environmental  
Monitoring:    
Is  it  right  for  you?

Rachael
 Perkins
 Arenstein,
 A.M.
 Art
 Conserva6on,
 LLC
 
December
 8,
 2016
 

Introduc;on

Webinar  Outline
•  Why
 monitor?
 
•  Overview
 of
 equipment
 op4ons
 
•  What
 is
 a
 datalogger?
 
•  Understanding
 wireless
 terminology
 
•  Survey
 of
 connected
 monitoring
 op4ons
 
•  Best
 prac4ces
 for
 monitoring
 

Why  Monitor?
•  Document
 and
 record
 the
 environment
 
•  Preserva4on
 analysis
 for
 items
 or
 collec4ons
 
•  Space
 condi4ons
 
•  Seasonal
 trends
 
•  Building
 characteris4cs
 

•  Basis
 of
 management
 decisions
 
•  Performance
 of
 AHU
•  Malfunc4ons
 
•  Improvements
 and
 op4miza4on
 

 

What  to  Monitor?  

We concentrate on T & RH
•  Heat and humidity are primary drivers
of decay
•  Relates directly to the HVAC operation

Overview  of  Hardware  Op;ons
•  Hygrometers
 
•  Hygrothermographs
 
•  Building
 management
 systems
 
•  Dataloggers
 
•  Connected
 systems
 

Hardware:  Hygrometers
•  Tradi4onal
 monitoring
 device
 
•  Difficult
 to
 examine
 long-­‐term
 trends
 or
 sta4s4cally
 
analyze
 data
 
•  Precludes
 use
 of
 data
 in
 computa4onal
 tools
 

Hardware:  Hygrothermographs
•  Tradi4onal
 monitoring
 device
 
•  Difficult
 to
 examine
 long-­‐term
 trends
 or
 
sta4s4cally
 analyze
 data
 
•  Precludes
 use
 of
 data
 in
 computa4onal
 
tools
 

Hardware:  Building  Management  Systems
•  Separate,
 proprietary,
 secure
 
•  BMS
 is
 control,
 not
 analysis
 
•  Requires
 large
 commitment
 of
 
facili4es
 staff
 4me
 
•  But,
 s4ll
 can
 have
 its
 place
 

Hardware:  Dataloggers
•  Electronic
 devices
 that
 measure
 
T
 &
 RH
 for
 graphing
 and
 analysis
 
on
 computer
 
•  Most
 popular
 and
 prac4cal
 

Standalone  loggers

Connected  Systems

Costs
•  Viable
 loggers
 range
 in
 cost
 from
 approx.
 $70
 to
 $900.
 
 
 
•  There
 is
 a
 reason
 why
 loggers
 are
 priced
 the
 way
 they
 are.
 
•  Do
 not
 expect
 an
 inexpensive
 product
 to
 perform
 the
 same
 as
 a
 
high-­‐end
 product.
 
•  There
 are
 uses
 for
 both
 ends
 of
 the
 spectrum.
 
•  Don’t
 be
 penny
 wise
 and
 pound
 foolish.
 

http://www.cr.nps.gov/museum/publications/conserveogram/03-03.pdf

Hardware  Specifica;ons
S6ll
 Cri6cal
 
•  Opera4ng
 Range
 
•  Accuracy
 
•  Calibra4on
 
 
•  Power
 Source
 /
 BaXery
 
Life
 
•  Sampling
 Rate
 
 
•  Size
 Appearance
 and
 
Construc4on
 
•  Alerts
 /
 Alarms
 

Less
 Cri6cal?
 
•  Memory
 Capacity
 /
 Run
 
Time
 
•  Probe
 
•  Display
 
•  Start/Stop
 Op4ons
 

Newly
 Cri6cal
 
•  Transmission
 

SoFware  Considera;ons
•  Data
 retrieval
 op4ons
 
•  SoZware
 pla[orm
 compa4bility
 
•  Formats
 for
 data
 and
 graphs
 
•  Data
 viewing
 and
 analysis
 op4ons
 
•  Graph
 modifica4on
 op4ons
 
•  Customer
 Service
 &
 Technical
 Support
 

Terminology
•  Wireless
 –
 “having
 no
 wires”
 but
 in
 the
 technology
 
world
 describes
 any
 network
 where
 there
 is
 no
 physical
 
connec4on
 between
 the
 sender
 and
 receiver.
 
 
 

•  Cloud
 –
 shared
 compu4ng
 resources
 on
 demand
 rather
 
than
 using
 local
 servers
 or
 devices
 to
 handle
 
applica4ons.
 “THE
 cloud”
 =
 “the
 Internet”
 
 

Terminology
•  Wi-­‐Fi
 –
 a
 popular
 networking
 technology
 that
 uses
 radio
 waves
 
to
 provide
 wireless
 high-­‐speed
 network
 connec4ons.
 
 

•  Network
 –
 
 computers
 that
 are
 linked
 together
 into
 a
 
system.
 A
 LAN
 or
 local-­‐area
 network
 generally
 describes
 a
 
system
 in
 a
 single
 building
 using
 Ethernet.
 
 

Terminology
•  RF
 –
 radio
 frequency,
 is
 any
 frequency
 
within
 the
 electromagne4c
 spectrum
 
associated
 with
 radio
 wave
 propaga4on.
 
When
 an
 RF
 current
 reaches
 an
 antenna,
 
an
 electromagne4c
 field
 is
 created
 that
 can
 
propagate
 through
 space.
 
 

Terminology
•  Bluetooth
 –
 a
 short-­‐range
 radio
 technology
 aimed
 at
 
simplifying
 communica4ons
 between
 devices.
 
 
 

•  NFC
 –
 Near
 Field
 Communica5on
 is
 a
 technology
 that
 
enables
 convenient
 short-­‐range
 communica4on
 
between
 electronic
 devices.
 
 

Terminology
•  Cellular
 
 
•  GSM
 -­‐
 Global
 System
 for
 Mobile
 Communica5ons
 
 
•  CDMA
 -­‐
 Code-­‐Division
 Mul5ple
 Access
 
 
•  GPRS
 -­‐
 General
 Packet
 Radio
 Service
 

•  Infrared
 –
 also
 some4mes
 seen
 as
 “IrDA”
 short
 
for
 Infrared
 Data
 Associa5on,
 a
 group
 of
 device
 manufacturers
 
that
 developed
 a
 standard
 for
 transmieng
 data
 via
 infrared
 
light
 waves.
 
 
•  RFID
 –
 Radio
 Frequency
 Iden5fica5on
 is
 a
 short-­‐range
 radio
 
technology
 aimed
 at
 simplifying
 communica4ons
 among
 
devices.
 
 
 

What  to  Choose?

RTR-­‐500  Series  loggers

TR-7 Series

TR-7 Series

Testo Saveris2

Testo Saveris2

Lascar EL-WiFi-TH and TH+

EasyLog WiFi Software

Onset Bluetooth Temp/RH MX1101

Onset Bluetooth Temp/RH MX1101

Lascar  EL-­‐BT-­‐2  Bluetooth  Wireless  Temperature  
and  Humidity  Data  Logger

GR4 Series
•  Bluetooth logger
•  Phone or tablet app
•  Expected early 2017

RADIO

Hanwell
•  Smart Receiver - SR2
•  ML4000RHT Humidity
series sensors
•  Repeater
•  Synergy Software

Eltek GenII Wireless Logging System

Onset Hobo ZW Data Nodes
sensor

receiver

Log-EZ RTR322

DIY  Op;ons

Registrar
 Trek
 Blog
 by
 Angela
 Kipp
 
hXp://world.museumsprojekte.de/
 
 

Reasons  To  Use  Wireless  Or  Connected  Systems
•  Real-­‐4me
 data
 
•  Off-­‐site
 loca4ons
 
•  Lots
 of
 data
 
•  Enclosed
 spaces
 

Are  you  ready  for  a  connected  system?
•  How
 many
 spaces
 are
 you
 monitoring?
 
 
•  Do
 you
 have
 the
 budget?
 
•  Do
 you
 have
 a
 robust
 network
 in
 your
 ins4tu4on?
 
•  Do
 you
 have
 an
 IT
 person/department?
 
•  Are
 they
 on
 board?
 

•  What
 is
 your
 building
 construc4on?
 
•  Are
 you
 ready
 to
 keep
 up
 with
 the
 costs?
 
 
 

Troubleshoo;ng  Wireless  &  Connected  Systems
•  Building
 construc4on
 
•  Metal
 
•  Concrete
 
•  Other
 wireless
 devices
 e.g.
 
wireless
 phones
 
•  Other
 “noisy”
 devices
 
 e.g.
 
fluorescent
 lights
 

•  IT
 knowledge
 and
 support
 
•  Device
 compa4bility
 
•  Firmware
 updates
 

Guidelines:  Logger  Loca;ons  &  Coverage
•  No
 magical
 number
 of
 monitors/loca4ons
 
•  Monitor
 what
 YOU
 need
 to
 know
 
•  Wherever
 there
 is
 reason
 to
 believe
 condi4ons
 
may
 differ
 
•  Source
 of
 heat,
 cold,
 moisture
 

What  are  you  monitoring?

Guidelines:  Logger  Placement
•  Amidst
 collec4ons
 or
 in
 display
 
•  4-­‐6
 feet
 from
 floor
 
•  Accessible
 for
 downloading
 
•  Away
 from
 HVAC
 supply
 ducts
 

Guidelines:  Data  Management
•  Data
 should
 be
 examined
 regularly
 
•  Monthly
 
•  Seasonal
 
•  Anomalies
 or
 emergencies
 

•  Data
 should
 be
 easily
 accessible
 
•  Backup
 to
 network/dedicated
 folder
 

Acknowledgements
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

Samantha Alderson, American Museum of Natural History
Scott Ellis, Onset Computer Corp.
Steve Knuth, TandD
Claudio Heitkamp, Testo, Inc.
Kelly Becker, Lascar Electronics Inc.
Greg Basso, Cascade Systems
Tony King, CAS systems
Image Permanence Institute
C2CCare Advisory Group

Rachael Perkins Arenstein

www.AMArtConservation.com
rachael@amartconservation.com