How to Play Chess: Detailed Rules of the Most Intelligent Game

 Kevin Brown
  Dec 04, 2018

Chess Game Rules

Want to know how to play chess? Well, know the background first. Chess is a game played by two players. One of the players plays the white pieces, and the other player plays the black pieces. Each player has pieces of the sixteen at the beginning of the game: A King, a Queen, two Crooks, two bishops, two Knights and eight pawns.

Well, if you ask how to play chess, these are the basic things you should know - The game is played on a chessboard, consisting of 64 squares: eight rows and eight columns. The squares are alternately light (white) and coloured dark. The card should be placed such that there is a black square in the corner under left. To facilitate the notation of moves, all squares are given a name. View the white player, the rows are numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8; the lower row has number 1, and the top row has number 8. The columns, from left to right, are named a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h. square.

Alternatively, if you know how to play chess, players make a movement, beginning with the white player (the player that plays with the white pieces.) A movement consists in moving from one of the pieces of the player to a different square, after the rules of movement for that piece - there is a special anomaly, named the Castle, where players move two pieces at the same time.

A player may lead to a piece of the opponent by the moving of their own pieces to the square that contains a piece of the opponent. The opponent's piece then removed card, and play for the rest of the game. (the take is not mandatory.)

Chess Rules

At the beginning of the game, the position of the pieces is as follows.

The rook moves in a line straight, horizontally or vertically. The rook cannot jump concluded other pieces, that is: all the squares between the square where the rook begins its movement and where the rook ends its movement must be empty. (as for all the pieces, when the square where the rook ends its movement contains a piece of the opponent, then this piece is taken. The square where the rook ends its movement may not contain a piece of the player who possesses this rook.) There is a special rule, call take the in-passant-passant. When a pawn makes a step double of the second row to the fourth row, and there is a commitment to enemy in an adjacent square in the fourth row, then this commitment the in the enemy movement then can move diagonally to the square that was passed over by the commitment to double-double-stepping, which is in the third row. This same movement, takes the pawn double-double-stepping. This in-passant-passant that takes must be done directly: If the player who could take the in-passant-passant does not do this in the first movement after the double step, this commitment cannot be taken over by a stroke in-passant-passant.

Chess Game

If you want to know how to play chess, should know that The King moves one square in any direction, horizontally, vertically or diagonally. There is a special type of movement, made by a King and a swindler simultaneously, called castling: see below.

The King is the most important piece of the game, and the movements must be made in such a way that the King is never in check: see below.

According to the chess rules, The following conditions must be met:

  • The King who makes the move that castles still has not moved in the game.
  • The rook that makes the movement that castles still has not moved in the game.
  • The King is not in check.

Chess rules say that The King does not move concluded a square which is attacked by an enemy piece during movement which castles, i.e., to the Castle, there may not be a piece enemy that can move (in case of pawns: by the diagonal movement) to a square that is moved in top by the King.

The King is not moved to a square which is attacked by an enemy piece during movement which castles, i.e. you cannot Castle and end the movement with the King in check.

All squares between the scammer and the King before the movement that castles are empty.

In the chess game, Castling, the King moves two squares towards a rook, and movements concluded the King to the next square, i.e. King of the rook of white E1 and rook on a1 move a: King c1, d1 swindler (long castling), King of the white E1 and swindler in h1 moves a: King g1, Rook f1 (castling short), and similar for black.

You are not allowed to make a move, such that a King is in check after the movement. If a player accidentally tries to make such a move, he must take the movement back and make another move (after the rules that one must move the piece one has touched, see below.)

When a player is in check in the chess game, and he can't do a motion such that once the movement, the King is not in check, then attached it. The player dock is that you lost the game, and the player who docked it won the game.

When black must move, the game is a stalemate. After making a move, a player can propose a draw: your opponent can validate the offer (in which case ends, and is a draw play) or reject the offer (in which case continues the game).

Well, that’s about it. We hope now you know how to play chess and know the chess rules. The chess game is challenging and we hope you’re ready for it!

How to Play Chess: Detailed Rules of the Most Intelligent Game

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown is a journalist at his own start-up, born and residing in Seattle, Washington. He has a knack of reading up newspaper articles and coming up with summaries and points of view, hence taking up a profession similar to his interest. Simply covering events and activities is something he can do as good as a professional, but he seems to enjoy writing on events that need viewpoints and suggestions.

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