Meet the Masters of Camouflage: Wraparound Spider and Trapdoor Spider

 Kevin Brown
  Jan 03, 2019

Camouflage is a fascinating quality that is observed among several animals in nature and surprisingly, some species of spiders are blessed with this amazing technique. Wraparound spider and trapdoor spider are two such spiders who use camouflage technique. Read below to discover some amazing facts about these spiders:

The Wraparound Spider

Wraparound Spider

Wraparound spiders are arachnids with unique camouflage capabilities. They camouflage themselves among plants and twigs to hide from predators. They belong to Dolophones Conifera genus. There are around 17 species of wraparound spiders that are found in Australia and Oceania.

These camouflage spiders have concavely shaped abdomen and fuzz-covered legs, which enables them to flatten themselves around the tree branches. The upper part of their body is made up of oval discs that run across the abdomen and looks like a shield. Their camouflage capabilities help them save themselves from predators. These spiders are covered in prickly hairs which make them look really creepy.

During the day wraparound spider hides in the plain sight from the wasps and birds using their unique survival technique. At night, they come out and build large spider webs between trees to capture their prey.

Wraparound spiders belong to Araneidae family of orb-weavers. The male wraparound spiders are 4-5 mm in size whereas their female counterparts tend to grow a little bigger in size, around 8mm. They are not dangerous but they can attack if provoked. However, their bite is not harmful to humans.

Wraparound might look creepy and give you nightmares but it actually is a peaceful spider who just enjoys being on his own!

The Trapdoor Spider

It is not just wraparound spider that has amazing camouflage abilities, Trapdoor spider which belong to family Ctenizidae of the order Araneae also display some unique camouflage skills. These spiders are medium-sized spiders that dig impressive burrows with a hinging door that actually open and close. They construct this cork like a door using soil, vegetation, and silk.

Trapdoor spiders are around 2.5cm long but they are capable of reaching the length of 4 cm. These spiders have 8 eyes, a pair of eyes in middle and 3 eyes on each side. They have sharp fangs and powerful jaws that stab downward into its prey. Their body structure is divided into 8 thick and short legs, 2 fangs and abdomen and thorax. The body of the trapdoor spider is covered with hair and they are able to run very fast. These spiders are generally found in Japan, South America, Africa, and North America at warm places.

Trapdoor spiders prefer to live underground. These spiders do not create webs like other spiders but dig 30 centimeters deep burrows with a trapdoor on its top. At times, they make such burrows beside rivers to catch tiny fishes. It is very difficult to spot this trapdoor as plants and soil perfectly camouflage it. At night they wait for their prey holding underside of the trapdoor with their claws. They jump out of the burrow and capture the prey as soon as it comes near the half-open trapdoor.

The trapdoor spider mate with the female spider in the female burrow and it tends to mate with several female spiders before dying. The female spiders lay eggs some months after the mating in her own burrow and protect them fiercely. When spiderlings are hatched they remain inside the burrow for several months. Once they get bigger, they go out and make their own miniature burrow. They keep widening their burrow as their size gets bigger. These spiders have a lifespan of 5 to 20 years. Once matured, female trapdoor spiders stay in their burrows whereas male spider leaves the burrow and go in search of the mate.

Predators for the trapdoor spiders are wasps, scorpions, birds, bandicoots, centipedes etc. They feed themselves on insects, baby birds, baby snakes, mice, frogs, and small fish. Trapdoor spider is timid and non-aggressive but it might get aggressive when it feels threatened or harassed. They rarely bite humans and their bite is non-toxic although it can cause severe pain. Some people like to keep trapdoor spiders as a pet but one should always be careful.

Meet the Masters of Camouflage: Wraparound Spider and Trapdoor Spider

Kevin Brown

Kevin Brown is a journalist at his own start-up, born and residing in Seattle, Washington. He has a knack of reading up newspaper articles and coming up with summaries and points of view, hence taking up a profession similar to his interest. Simply covering events and activities is something he can do as good as a professional, but he seems to enjoy writing on events that need viewpoints and suggestions.

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