Parents Guide To Legal Drugs Kids are Using and Abusing

Parents Guide To Legal Drugs Kids are Using and Abusing

Loading
Loading Social Plug-ins...
Language: English
Save to myLibrary Download PDF
Go to Page # Page of 5

Description: As President and CEO of The Partnership at Drugfree.org, Steve Pasierb is a national leader on the topic of teen drug use and abuse. He is a frequent commentator for the national and local news media on drug safety issues and the current trends in teen drug use. In collaboration with Be Smart.

Be Well. Steve is working to raise awareness of prescription and over-the-counter drug abuse and offers advice for keeping kids safe from drugs use and abuse.

 
Author: Steve Pasierb  | Visits: 303 | Page Views: 403
Domain:  Medicine Category: Therapy 
Upload Date:
Link Back:
Short URL: https://www.wesrch.com/medical/pdfME1LYY000HAAH
Loading
Loading...



px *        px *

* Default width and height in pixels. Change it to your required dimensions.

 
Contents:
Block Busters
Sticks
le Drink Red Devils Dance
uck Drivers White Stuff
Jackpot Vike Schoo
key
DRUG GUIDE
Watson 387Black B
atches
Emma China Girl Orange C
Jelly Beans
Oscar be smart be well.com
H
AC/DC Reds and Blues
R
Apache
Benz
PRESCRIPTION AND OVER - THE - COUNTER

A parent’s guide to the legal drugs kids are using and abusing

presented by

Block Busters
Sticks EXPERT
ASK THE Red Devils
le Drink
Dance
uck Drivers White Stuff
Jackpot Vike Schoo
key
Watson 387Black B
atches
Emma China Girl Orange C
Jelly Beans
Oscar
H
AC/DC Reds and Blues
Apache
be smart be well.com R
Benz
A conversation with Steve Pasierb, President
and CEO of The Partnership at Drugfree.org

As President and CEO of The Partnership at Drugfree.org, Steve Pasierb is a national leader on the topic of teen drug use and abuse. He
is a frequent commentator for the national and local news media on drug safety issues and the current trends in teen drug use. In
collaboration with Be Smart. Be Well., Steve is working to raise awareness of prescription and over-the-counter drug abuse and offers
advice for keeping kids safe from drug use and abuse. See the complete video at besmartbewell.com/spotlight-newsletter.
BESMARTBEWELL: Why are young people abusing prescription drugs?

STEVE PASIERB: Kids are coming to prescription drug abuse for very specific reasons. Some aim to get high as a way of dealing with stress
and depression in their lives. Some children are very tactical; they use prescription drugs in order to do better at school. So kids usually
have a very sophisticated usage approach when it comes to these drugs. It is not just as simple as using them to go out and get wrecked.
BESMARTBEWELL: What over-the-counter drugs are most abused by teens and young adults?

STEVE PASIERB: What kids seek in over-the-counter drugs is an active ingredient in cough medicines, dextromethorphan, which gives
them a drunk, dreamy, disassociated kind of feeling. Many kids become dependent on it, though. It has transitioned from a fringe behavior
to something more mainstream. One in 10 kids in America have abused cough medicine.
BESMARTBEWELL: What is the right age to talk with your kid about drugs, and how do I go about it?

STEVE PASIERB: The average age of first-time drug use in America is about 13-and-a-half years old. We encourage parents to have an
age-sensitive conversation, not a “big drug talk.” If your kids are in middle school, you can say: “What are you hearing in school? What is
going on? Who are your friends?” That gets you in. As your kid ages, you should ratchet up the specificity of the conversation. Try, “What
have you heard about this Ecstasy drug? Anybody in school talk about it?” This way, you’re not giving them a lecture on the harms of
Ecstasy; you’re having a general conversation. The net of the conversation to your kid is that you’re worried, and that this isn’t an acceptable
thing in your lives and family. That type of conversation is incredibly powerful, but it isn’t a lecture or a threat. Just a conversation.

PRESCRIPTION AND OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUG GUIDE
A parent’s guide to the legal drugs kids are using and abusing

Codeine

Fentanyl

Morphine

Oxycodone HCL

Codeine is a prescription pain reliever that may
be used to relieve mild to moderate pain and to
reduce coughing when used in combination with
other medications.

Fentanyl is a powerful pain reliever typically
used to treat severe pain or pain after surgery.

Morphine is a powerful prescription pain
reliever prescribed to relieve moderate to
severe pain and is highly addictive.

Oxycodone HCL is a prescription pain reliever that
may be prescribed to relieve moderate to severe pain.
It can be combined with other medications, including
acetaminophen and ibuprofen.

(Limited selection as there are over 50 brand names of
codeine alone and in combination with other medications)

Actiq®, Fentora®,
Duragesic®, Sublimaze®

Roxanol®, Duramorph®

OxyContin®, Percocet®, Tylox®,
Roxicodone®, Roxicet®

T3s, AC/DC, Coties

Apache, China Girl, Patches, Dance Fever

M, Miss Emma, Monkey, White stuff

Oxy, O/C, Orange Crush, Oscar, Ocean, Blues Clues-Roxi

Tablet, Capsule, Liquid

Dissolving tablet, Liquid for injection, Lollipop, Lozenge,
Transdermal patch, White powder

Tablets, Liquid, Powder, Patch (included in part
of fentanyl patch Duragesic©)

Tablets, Liquid, Powder, Patch

HOW IT IS USED

Swallowed

Injected, Smoked, Snorted

Injected, Swallowed, Smoked

Swallowed, Snorted, Injected, Rectally

DANGEROUS
BECAUSE

Side effects when abused include:
Difficulty breathing or swallowing, rash, itching,
hives, changes in vision, seizures, and fast,
pounding or irregular heartbeat

Serious side effects include: Weak or shallow
breathing, severe weakness, drowsiness,
confusion, cold or clammy skin, feeling
light-headed, fainting, coma

Both physical and psychological addiction can develop
quickly with morphine.

Abuse of Oxycodone can result in severe
respiratory depression and death.

Serious side effects of use include: Sedation, respiratory
depression and arrest, unconsciousness, coma, death

TEEN USAGE

1 in 5 teens have abused a
prescription pain reliever

1 in 5 teens have abused a
prescription pain reliever

1 in 5 teens have abused a
prescription pain reliever

1 in 5 teens have abused a
prescription pain reliever

Sixty percent of teens who have abused
prescription painkillers did so before age 15.

Nine million teens surveyed say they can
get prescription drugs in a day.

Abusing prescription painkillers is just as dangerous,
addictive and deadly as using heroin.

Twenty percent of teens report buying pain relievers
from a friend or relative or taking the drug from a
friend or relative without asking
(Rx report from ONDCP, 2007).

Nausea, constipation, confusion, sedation, respiratory
depression and arrest, addiction, unconsciousness,
coma, euphoria/feelings of joy, drowsiness/lethargy,
concentration problems, change in physical activity,
pinpoint pupils, appetite changes

Nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, constipation,
dizziness, drowsiness, headache, swelling,
unconsciousness

Nausea, constipation, confusion

Constipation, nausea, sedation, dizziness, vomiting,
headache, dry mouth, sweating, weakness, mental
clouding, pinpoint pupils

WHAT IS IT?

BRAND /
COMMERCIAL
NAMES

STREET NAMES
LOOKS LIKE

IMPORTANT
TO KNOW

SIGNS OF ABUSE

Brontex®, Capital and Codeine®, Fiorinal® with Codeine
(as a combination product containing Codeine Phosphate,
Aspirin, Butabarbital, and Caffeine), Guiatussin® with
Codeine , Mytussin® AC Cough Syrup, Robafen AC®
Syrup, Robitussin A-C® Syrup, Tussi-Organidin®-S
NR,Tylenol with Codeine (No. 2, No. 3, No. 4)®

Copyright 2011 The Partnership at Drugfree.org

Learn more at besmartbewell.com/drug-safety and drugfree.org

PRESCRIPTION AND OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUG GUIDE
A parent’s guide to the legal drugs kids are using and abusing

Hydrocodone bitartrate
with acetaminophen

Barbiturates

Benzodiazepines

Flunitrazepam

WHAT IS IT?

Hydrocodone bitartrate is a prescription medication often
combined with acetaminophen (which increases the effect
of the hydrocodone) to relieve moderate to severe pain. In
the United States there are over 200 products containing
hydrocodone with acetaminophen (Vicodin, Lortab).
Hydrocone is also combined with aspirin (Lortab ASA),
ibuprofen (Vicoprofen) and antihistamines (Hycomine).

Barbiturates are central nervous system depressants
that slow down the mind and body, causing drowsiness
and sleepiness.

Benzodiazepines are among the most commonly
prescribed depressant medications in the United
States today. More than 15 different types of
benzodiazepine medications exist. They are prescribed
for relaxation, calmness, and relief from anxiety and
tension. Some benzodiazepines are used to treat
seizures or insomnia or other conditions.

Flunitrazepam may be prescribed to treat insomnia or
given prior to anesthesia. It is a derivative of
Benzodiazipine. It is not available in the United
States but is available in 60 other countries

BRAND/ COMMERCIAL
NAMES

Hocodan®, Lorcet®, Lortab®, Vicodin®, Vicoprofen®,
Tussionex®, Norco®

Amytal®, Nembutal®, Seconal®,
Phenobarbital, Tuinal

Ativan®, Halcion®, Librium®,
Valium®, Xanax®

Rohypnol

Vike, Watson-387, Hydro, Tuss

Barbs, Block Busters, Christmas Trees, Golf Balls,
Pinks, Reds, Red Birds, Red Devils, Reds and Blues,
Phennies, Tooies, Yellows,Yellow Jackets

Sticks, BenZ, Footballs, Bars, French Fries, Ladders

R-2, Mexican Valium, Rophies, Roofies, Circle

LOOKS LIKE

Tablets, Liquid

Multi-colored tablets and capsules

Tablets, Liquid

Tablets (small olive green, oblong tablet with the number 542)

HOW IT IS USED

Swallowed

Injected, Swallowed

Injected, Swallowed

Swallowed, Crushed, Snorted

Serious side effects include: Sedation, respiratory
depression and arrest, unconsciousness, coma, death

Higher doses cause irritability, paranoia, suicidal
thoughts, unusual excitement, fever, life-threatening
withdrawal, impaired memory, judgment and
coordination.

Side effects of abusing benzodiazepines include: Impaired
motor coordination, drowsiness, lethargy, fatigue, impaired
thinking and memory, confusion, depression, altered vision,
slurred speech, stuttering, vertigo, tremors, respiratory
depression, nausea, constipation, dry mouth, abdominal
discomfort, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea

Side effects of abusing flunitazepam include: Impaired
motor coordination, drowsiness, lethargy, fatigue,
impaired thinking and memory, anterior grade
amnesia, nausea, constipation, dry mouth, abdominal
discomfort, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea

1 in 5 teens have abused a prescription pain reliever

1 in 11 12th graders have abused sedatives
and tranquilizers

1 in 11 12th graders have abused sedatives and
tranquilizers in their lifetime

1 in 11 12th graders have abused sedatives
and tranquilizers in their lifetime

Most teens get their prescription drugs from their
own family’s medicine cabinet.

Barbiturates mimic alcohol intoxication, causing mild
euphoria, relief of anxiety and sleepiness.

Abusing sedatives with alcohol can slow both the heart
rate and respiration and possibly lead to death.

Fifty-five percent of teens agree it is easy to get
prescription drugs from their parent’s medicine
cabinets.

Abuse can lead to physical dependence and barbiturate
withdrawal can be life-threatening.

Abuse can lead to physical and psychological
dependency with serious withdrawal symptoms,
including sweating, tremor, vomiting, anxiety, insomnia
and muscle pain.

Rohypnol has become infamous for being known as
the “date rape drug” due to its ability to be easily
mixed into liquids and fast acting side effects,
coupled with short term memory loss.

Nausea, constipation, confusion, euphoria, mental
clouding, changes in sleep (increase when using,
insomnia/irritability when withdrawing), acting as if
in “stupor,” pinpoint pupils, problems with
academics/extra-curricular activities

Slurred speech, shallow breathing,
sluggishness, fatigue, disorientation,
lack of coordination, dilated pupils

STREET NAMES

DANGEROUS
BECAUSE

TEEN USAGE

IMPORTANT
TO KNOW

SIGNS OF ABUSE

Copyright 2011 The Partnership at Drugfree.org

Long-term effects of benzodiazepines include: Slowed
reflexes, mood swings, hostile and erratic behavior,
euphoria, disorientation, confusion, slurred speech,
muscle weakness, lack of coordination, impaired
thinking, memory, and judgment

Learn more at besmartbewell.com/drug-safety and drugfree.org

Abusing sedatives with alcohol can slow both the
heart rate and respiration and possibly lead to death.
Slowed reflexes, long periods of sleep or drowsiness,
memory loss, disorientation, confusion, slurred
speech, muscle weakness, lack of coordination,
impaired thinking, memory, and judgment

PRESCRIPTION AND OVER-THE-COUNTER DRUG GUIDE
A parent’s guide to the legal drugs kids are using and abusing

Amphetamine

WHAT IS IT?

BRAND/ COMMERCIAL
NAMES

STREET NAMES

LOOKS LIKE
HOW IT IS USED

DANGEROUS
BECAUSE

TEEN USAGE

IMPORTANT
TO KNOW

SIGNS OF ABUSE

Methylphenidate

Dextromethorphan (DXM)

It is a stimulant because it mimics the effect adrenaline
has on the body. Amphetamines may be prescribed for the
treatment of ADHD and a sleep disorder called narcolepsy.

Methylphenidate is the most commonly prescribed
central nervous stimulant use to treat ADHD. It may also
be used to treat a sleep disorder called narcolepsy.

Dextromethorphan (DXM) is an ingredient found in
any cold medicine with the “DM” or “TUSS” in the
title or name. In fact, DXM is in almost half of all
of the OTC drugs sold in the United States,
making it easy to get, cheap, and legal.

Biphetamine, Dexedrine®, Adderall®, Concerta®

Ritalin®

Any Cold Medicine with “DM” or “TUSS” in the title such as:
Dimetapp DM®, Nyquil®, Robitussin®,
Theraflu®, Vick’s Formula 44®

Bennies, Black Beauties, Crosses, Hearts,
LA Turnaround, Speed, Truck Drivers, Uppers,
Addies, A Train

JIF, MPH, R-ball, Skippy, The Smart Drug, Vitamin R

Orange Crush, Triple C’s, C-C-C, Red Devils, Skittles,
Dex, Vitamin D, Robo, Robo-trippin, Robo-dosing

Tablets, Capsules, Powder

Tablets

Cough medicine sold over the counter in drug stores
and general stores

Injected, Swallowed, Snorted

Injected, Swallowed, Snorted

Swallowed, Snorted

Can cause rapid or irregular heartbeat, delirium,
panic, psychosis, and heart failure.

Increased blood pressure, heart rate and
body temperature; feelings of hostility and paranoia;
serious cardiovascular complications, including
stroke, dilated pupils

Serious side effects include: Nausea, loss of coordination,
headache, vomiting, loss of consciousness, numbness of
fingers and toes, abdominal pain, irregular heartbeat, high
blood pressure, seizures, panic attacks, psychosis, brain
damage, addiction, insomnia, coma, death

1 in 10 teens have abused Adderall or Ritalin

1 in 10 teens have abused Adderall or Ritalin

1 in 10 teens have abused cough medicine to get high

Teens (12 to 17 years) who abuse stimulants are more
likely to engage in other delinquent behavior such as
fighting or selling drugs.

Many teens abuse prescribed stimulant medication to
help them cram for exams or suppress their appetite.

Only 48 percent of teens believe taking cough medicine
to get high is risky.
Kids as young as 12 years are trying or using
prescription drugs to get high.

Teens (12 to 17 years) who abuse prescription
stimulants are more likely to experience a major
depressive episode.
Reduced appetite, weight loss, nervousness,
insomnia, aggressiveness, impulsive behavior, dilated
pupils (can't see eye color), high body temperature

Decreased sleep and appetite, increased alertness,
attention span, energy

Copyright 2011 The Partnership at Drugfree.org

Nausea, loss of coordination, headache, vomiting,
slurred speech, disassociation

Learn more at besmartbewell.com/drug-safety and drugfree.org